Journal Club

Scientists have to read about and understand the current scientific literature. Lots of the time this is done alone, at your desk in the office or the lab, for hours and hours so that you can really start to understand whatever topic it is that you’re studying. But one of my favorite ways to share scientific papers is through a weekly meeting with the whole lab called a Journal Club. Although my husband laughs about this kind of nerdy science “club” (akin to his amusement about scientific societies), it’s a great way to discuss a particular topic and dive deep into a discussion about how the researchers got their results and came to their conclusions.  In our Journal Clubs, we’ll do an abbreviated version of this discussion for a particular paper. 

Stem Cells to Treat Spinal Cord Injury

Journal Club: Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury Written by DePaul, et al. in the journal Scientific Reports. The complete article is here. Background: Stem cells are unique in that they can divide indefinitely and can turn into multiple different ...
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Journal Club – A mutation in mice to study ALS

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disease that affects neurons in the brain, brain stem, and spinal cord. When these neurons die, it affects the connections that they have to muscles throughout the body resulting in muscle weakness that affects speaking, swallowing and breathing leading to paralysis and ...
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The Cancer Genome Atlas Project (TCGA): Understanding Glioblastoma

In 2003, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and researchers around the world celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA by Jim Watson and Francis Crick. I was a graduate student in the Watson School of Biological Science at CSHL, named after James Watson who was ...
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Journal Club: The Microbiome Autism Connection

As I've mentioned in other posts, scientists have to read about and understand the current scientific literature. Lots of the time this is done alone, at your desk in the office or the lab, for hours and hours so that you can really understand whatever topic it is that you're ...
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