What is Informed Consent for Research Subjects?

informed_consentAs I mentioned in my last post, the Institutional Review Board (or IRB) has a responsibility to review and monitor all human subject research to help ensure that the subjects are treated ethically.  But how does the patient know what they are getting into if they are interested in participating in  a research study?

One of the key parts of the Belmont Report (that report that sets the rule for human subject research) says that subjects must be treated with respect.  A huge part of this is to inform research subjects about the research, the risks, and the possible benefits. Because of the importance of informing the subject, most research studies involve providing the potential participant with an Informed Consent Form (ICF) that the they must read, understand, and sign before joining a clinical trial.  This informed consent form is reviewed by the IRB and usually much discussion goes into whether it is clear (ideally 6th-8th grade reading level), accurate, and informative.

So how do investigators or the IRB know what to inform the potential participant about in this informed consent? Well the government tells us – of course! The intuitively named Title 45 CFR 46 subparts A, B, C and D outline the rules and regulations for human subjects research.  Because this is the government’s stupid way of naming things, the easier name used for these rules is the Common Rule. This rule outlines what’s needed in an informed consent form (paraphrased directly from the Common Rule):

  1. A statement that the study involves research, an explanation of the purposes of the research and the expected length of the subject’s participation, a description of the procedures to be followed, and identification of any procedures which are experimental.
  2. A description of any reasonably foreseeable risks or discomforts.
  3. A description of any benefits to the subject or to others which may reasonably be expected from the research.
  4. A disclosure of appropriate alternative procedures or courses of treatment, if any, that might benefit the subject.
  5. A statement describing the extent, if any, to which confidentiality of records identifying the subject will be maintained and that notes the possibility that the Food and Drug Administration may inspect the records.
  6. For research involving more than minimal risk, an explanation as to whether any compensation and an explanation as to whether any medical treatments are available if injury occurs and, if so, what they consist of, or where further information may be obtained.
  7. An explanation of whom to contact for answers to pertinent questions about the research and research subjects’ rights, and whom to contact in the event of a research-related injury to the subject.
  8. A statement that participation is voluntary, that refusal to participate will involve no penalty or loss of benefits to which the subject is otherwise entitled, and that the subject may discontinue participation at any time without penalty or loss of benefits to which the subject is otherwise entitled.

The intent of the informed consent is for the subject to actually be informed.  This means that the investigator needs to clearly and honestly explain the research to the subject.  For example, when we provide informed consent for patients to provide tissue samples for the biobank, we tell them that their tissue may be used for any type of future research, it may be used to create commercial products but won’t financially benefit them, and that we won’t be able to provide any research results back to them.  In this context, participating in the biobank may sound like a raw deal.  However, we also explain how the tissue they donate will be used by researchers to better understand diseases and develop new treatment. Therefore, even though they may not directly receive benefit, they may benefit others with their disease in the future.

The potential participant is also given the chance to ask all the questions that they have about the study.  They can ask to bring the consent home to read it.  They can ask their doctor about it. Then after they are fully informed, they decide if they want to sign it or not. If not, that is okay.  It’s up to the patient if they want to participate and the investigator cannot do anything to coerce the patient to sign or participate.  At the same time, if the patient does decide to participate, they may leave the research study at any time with no penalties. Their participation is entirely voluntary.

One other quick note about making sure the patients are fully informed…the Common Rule has added additional safeguards in the case “when some or all of the subjects are likely to be vulnerable to coercion or undue influence.” These vulnerable subjects include children, prisoners, pregnant women, handicapped, or mentally disabled persons, or economically or educationally disadvantaged persons. For example, you don’t want to force imprisoned people to participate in research just because they are in jail or poor people to participate just because you are paying them a lot of money to participate.

The US Office of Human Research Protection is working on changes to the Common Rule right now (it’s called a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking – these silly government names).  The original re-write was sent out to the public for review in 2011.  The updated version was made available in September of this year (look at that for the glacial swiftness of the government!) for even more review.  It has many proposed changes that will affect human subject research and research using human tissue samples. To learn more about what this means for clinical and other research, check out the recent story from NPR.

Overall, the purpose of informed consent is to make sure anyone volunteering to participate in a research study knows what they are getting into. If you are interested in a clinical research study, can you find more at clinicaltrials.gov or talk to you physician.

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